Let’s Explore: Quinta Mazatlan

Hey RGV Moms, we’re adding more adventures to our “Let’s Explore” series and highlighting some great spots in the RGV to visit with your kiddos. Today’s stop: Quinta Mazatlan.

Quinta Mazatlan

RGVMB Directory Listing

Location: 600 Sunset Drive, McAllen

Phone: (956) 681-3370

Hours: Tuesday to Saturday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Open Thursday Nights until Dark

Cost: $3/adult and $2/child ages 3-12; kids 2 and under are free

Time Needed: 1-2 hours

Website: www.quintamazatlan.com

Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/McAllenNatureCenter

Let’s Explore!

Quinta Mazatlan is a hidden gem in McAllen that’s a great spot to get your kids out and into nature. It’s one of the nine World Birding Centers in the RGV.

After parking, you’ll need to check-in and pay at the mansion, so follow the red brick trail up the hill. Admission is $3/adult and $2/child ages 3-12.

Quinta Mazatlan has some great nature trails with informational signage that tells you about native plants and wildlife in the Rio Grande Valley. There are also lots of areas for the kids to play and get some energy out. Many of the paths have benches and seating areas, as well, in case your little ones get tuckered out.

Pre-pandemic, they offered some great programming for kids, including programs like Nature Tots, Buckets of Fun, and Summer Nights at the Mansion. We hope those fun activities start up again soon!

Quinta Mazatlan has a lot going on, from volunteer opportunities to scout workshops to school field trip programming. You can check out their website for more info.

Insider Tips:

  • Bring water, sunscreen, and bug spray
  • There’s plenty of shade, so plan your visit around your schedule!

RGV Moms, get out there and explore all that the Valley has to offer! Check out the “Outdoor Play” section of our Directory for more information and ideas!

We quit virtual learning on the second day of school, and I have zero regrets.

On the second day of mommy and me tears, we quit virtual learning — and I have zero regrets.

I’m 22 weeks pregnant, with a toddler, a preschooler, a first-grader, and I also work a full forty hours a week from home. I love my job, I love my kids, and I love the opportunities we have when I’m able to stay home with them, yet still provide income for our family.

Unfortunately, adding virtual school to my list of already full tasks just wasn’t feasible.

My daughter’s first day of first grade was pretty much a disaster. There were internet issues, streaming issues, reluctance, and frustration from my daughter about not being allowed to turn off her camera, and all kinds of chaos. She hated it, and I hated it. So, by the second day, we quit.

From Virtual Learning to Homeschooling

I called the school to attempt to unenroll my daughter and was told that it was just not an option — they told me she’d simply be marked absent for four weeks and then they’d contact us. I was upset and frustrated with the response because the last thing we need in 2020 is school attendance issues. I ended up joining and seeking counsel from the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA), an organization that assists parents who desire to homeschool.

How to Comply with Texas’s Homeschool Law | HSLDA

Choosing to homeschool over virtual was absolutely the right choice for my family.

This spring, when we were all tossed into the world of virtual learning, it nearly broke me. I didn’t know how to add that extra role to the roles that I was already performing while simultaneously coping with a fresh pregnancy loss. I had prayed hard about this upcoming school year, and weighed all the school options over the summer.

My husband and I decided that we’d try virtual again this fall — surely it couldn’t be any worse than it was in the spring, only it was. I simply couldn’t be my 6-year-old’s IT person and administrative assistant, while also working full-time and still being a sane mom to the little ones.

Doing actual schoolwork with my daughter off-camera was the easy part — it wasn’t any different than helping her with her homework. Unfortunately, with the technical aspects, and keeping up with hours of non-stop streaming, while still maintaining attempting somewhat of an 8-5 work schedule, virtual learning was impossible.

Do I Look Like an Octopus?

There is no more perfect way to describe how I felt that first week of school other than shouting at the universe, “DO I LOOK LIKE AN OCTOPUS?!”

One of my most-used mom phrases when my kids are all asking for something at the same time is, “Do I look like an octopus?” Of course, they giggle, and laugh and say, “No, you’re a human!” To which I reply, “Exactly! I only have two arms, not eight, so you’ll have to wait your turn.” The demands of non-flexible virtual schooling were just too much — another impossible task for my invisible octo-arms.

Ultimately, I felt like I had two options: a) quit my job or b) quit virtual school. SOMETHING had to give. It was the exact same dilemma we had this spring.

We don’t know what homeschooling will be like, but we’ve chosen our curriculum and a flexible school schedule that works with my work schedule.

Both my preschooler and first-grader were eager and ecstatic with our first few lessons (the exact opposite vibe we had with virtual school). My preschooler was also supposed to start school this fall, but because of the pandemic, he had to stay home too. So, he’s really loved feeling like a “big boy” doing his schoolwork. My toddler even gets a little school book to color to feel like she is part of the lessons.

I know that virtual learning may work for some families. If it does, that’s wonderful, but it isn’t a model that suits our family. I don’t expect homeschooling to be the easiest thing in the world, nor do I expect to be a perfect homeschooling mom, but I already know 100% that homeschool is the right choice for my children, and for me, right now.

How has virtual learning worked for you and your family? Are you also considering homeschooling instead?

From one Teacher to Another: You are the Phoenix

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Exhaustive. Unsustainable. Often defeating. We smile on camera as the Google Classroom we carefully constructed seems to burn all around us, our bitmoji mocks us with its posed perfection that resists execution of commands at the most crucial of times (just keep clicking…please let the link work…).

Stop. Look up. This is temporary.

From one teacher to another I want to tell you: Despite feeling the flames licking at the edge of your online classroom, you will not be defeated. You have nothing to fear because you are fire. You are the burning beauty of passion and pride and drive, and despite being exhausted, you persist.

Distance Learning is exhausting. But you keep smiling, you keep adjusting — the smiling/terrified/bored/confused faces in boxes in front of you are counting on you. For every missing or difficult child, there are those that are staring at you and excited to see your face.

They, like you, are showing up. They, like you, are fighting their fight.

This is not meant to be sustained, but to be a holding place until the return of the ideal, the normal, the sustainable. To hold teachers to the same standards that were set before the world was taken hostage by the insidious, invisible tyrant of disease is not maintaining normalcy. Rather, it is taking a marathon runner and forcibly removing a leg while handing them a pirate’s peg and saying, “run again now, but faster.”

We are posed with two choices: impossible #1 and incomprehensible #2 — as if these are the only ways of continuing our craft.

As teachers, we are told to make the best of things and innovate, while the decision-makers sit with their blades at ready to cut down our burgeoning excitement with another demand, directive or decision that requires that we innovate within parameters abjectly opposed to change, insistent that online learning should reflect “business as usual”.

There are better ways. There are sustainable ways. Unfortunately the channel that flows from national to state to local burns the paths on all sides, resulting in teachers running on our wooden pegs, crying for respite while those who gave us the wooden leg are forced to type with wooden fingers, their hands of help being severed by those that have zero concept of what it is to be in a classroom.

So we smile. We meet, we zoom, we canva, because that is what teachers do. We adapt. We pivot. We burn. We burn with passion for our craft, dedication to our students, and frustration at the impossible standards that have been set. This fire within us shall never be quenched.

But, dear teachers, we will remember these times. We will remember our difficult days devoid of validation of our struggles, and insistence that the status quo remains maintained. We will remember the demands that sapped us of our strength and cried for innovation without the willingness to accept change.

I urge you, you, who are clicking away furtively on your screen, look up.

Focus on this: You are the phoenix.

You will rise from the ashes of these days stronger, more beautiful, and more fierce than ever.

Always remember.

You are the phoenix. You will rise.

A super different, socially-distanced family outing

This weekend, for the first time in forever, we attempted a super different, socially-distanced family outing.

For the better part of the year, just like everyone else, we’ve been stuck at home. Pre-pandemic, the occasional, non-socially-distanced, family outing was something we prioritized. We regularly utilized our memberships to the Children’s Museum, Gladys Porter Zoo,  Sea Turtle Inc., and more. Nowadays, because of the Coronavirus, I can’t even remember the last time we left the house to explore as an entire family unit.

A trip to Gladys Porter Zoo

Gladys Porter Zoo called us recently to let us know about their COVID-19 safety changes and to inform us that they were actually open again (yay!), AND that our membership had been extended a few months past the expiration.

I’d been pretty hesitant to go anywhere, to be honest. We haven’t had much contact with anyone who doesn’t live in our house, nor have we really gone out much past doctor appointments and grocery store runs.

For safety reasons, two of our family vacations were canceled this year — one to California, and one to Florida. My kids, and my husband and I had been feeling pretty bummed about that, so we finally decided it was time to try SOME bit of normalcy with a family outing. When my husband and I surprised the kids the morning of they were SO so excited.

Masked kids, zoo family outing

We started the car and I had the biggest brain fart ever — what was I even supposed to pack?! I barely remembered diapers and wipes, and my husband suggested water. My son reminded me to take his fruit snacks. Then, of course, we had to pack masks, and back-up masks for those masks. Who knew it’d be so easy to forget how to pack a diaper bag!? Thanks, 2020!

Our socially-distanced experience at the zoo was really atypical.

The zoo had lots of tape and arrows to guide traffic. Masks kept slipping off the kids, and snacks were hard to do without finding designated snack areas, and oh my — am I out of shape! Halfway through the zoo, my pregnant self was ready to call it quits. My body hadn’t had this level of physical activity in MONTHS.

Masked adults, zoo family outing

There was one non-socially-distanced moment when I felt incredibly uncomfortable.

We’d tried hard to stay away from people the whole loop around the zoo — but an old granny found us unmasked, and vulnerable, eating our mid-day snacks at the Lion’s Den — she touched two of my three kids to not give them “ojo.”

Because it’s the culture I’ve grown up with it was hard to say anything to this sweet old lady, but inside, my heart was silently screaming, “We’re in a PANDEMIC, keep your hands off my kids!” Instead, I smiled nervously and whispered “gracias” when she told me how adorable my kids were.

Overall, despite a random grandma not maintaining her 6-ft, I think it was a good outing for our family. I don’t see this type of family outing becoming a regular part of our routine, but it was nice to have one day of semi-normalcy even if it meant wearing masks in the 103-degree heat, and social distancing.

For up-to-date information about the Gladys Porter Zoo and what they’re doing to maintain the safety of their guests, staff, and animals, please see their website and Facebook page. At the time this article is written, advanced reservations are required in addition to your membership. Reservations for your family outing can be made on their website.

What kind of socially distant family outings, if any, has your family had this summer?

Where have you gone? What was your experience like? Was it socially distanced? Did everyone around you follow the protocols and guidelines set in place?

Dear Teachers, Right Now, I See You

Dear Teachers,

Normally, I send my kids off to you in the morning and pick them up in the afternoon. I entrust my children to you and I trust that you’re doing your best.  I hear bits and pieces from my kiddos, but I don’t truly know what happens in your classroom.

But now, I see you.

I see your face on the other side of the screen — you’re literally in my kitchen and my living room and my office space all day long — but I see so much more than that.

I see all of the extras that you incorporate as you make a classroom (or a computer platform) into an environment of learning.

I see your smiling face and your polished Meet the Teacher slides. You don’t let on one bit that you’re facing a crazy, difficult, nearly impossible start to school.

I see you as you patiently answer the same question for the fifth time in a row.

I see you answer that same question, yet again.

I see you gladly filling every role that comes up, whether it is last minute DJ or nurse or IT support.

I see your bitmoji in so many forms, and I know the time and effort it took to get it looking so great.

I see you as you interact with other teachers with respect and an attitude of grace.

I see you prepping for the year through loss of power and water. Hurricane? Not when school starts in a week.

I see you worried about the health of your students, of yourself, of your city. You’re worried about their physical health, but also their mental and emotional and academic health. And I see it.

I see you as you make changes to make the class better.

I see you as you try something new, whether or not it works.

I see you as you respond to parent questions during what’s supposed to be your “lunch hour.”

I see you as you cheer on my children and as you push them to think on a deeper level.

I see you as you dance along and do silly motions and encourage my shy or scared or grumpy little one to join in the fun and the learning.

I see you as you struggle against technology and the clock and kids who are tired and antsy. I see you do it all with grace in your voice and a smile on your exhausted face.

I see you re-post all of the most important information from the day so that the parents who don’t get a chance to see you still know what’s happening in class.

I see you at home every night, just like my own teacher husband, exhausted and questioning the day and mustering up just a little more energy for the sweet ones living under your own roof.

Your efforts and your dedication do not go unseen. I promise.

 

Unprecedented: Weighing Options for School in the Fall

The beginning of the school year is quickly approaching, and it seems to be anything other than normal. Unprecedented is what I would call it.

There are so many questions on all of our minds.

How can we make sure that our children get a great education? How can we make sure that our children stay safe if and when we need to return to work?

An Unprecedented Time

Earlier this month, the Texas Education Agency issued guidelines that detail ways in which the state will be supporting families and schools when it comes to education during the pandemic. These guidelines were based on recommendations by both the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

In short, parents will have more of a say than ever when it comes to the school setting that is best for their children. Attendance (a mandatory of 90% of time that the class is offered, as usual) may be earned through in-person or virtual participation.

Wow. Just wow. If you have school-aged children, you’ve probably already received communication from your school district in the form of a survey or a draft of their plan. Scroll to the bottom of the page for a directory of school websites throughout the RGV.

An Unprecedented Amount of Choice

On-Campus Learning 

  • According to the TEA, “Daily on-campus learning will be available to all parents who would like their students to learn in school each day.”
  • Health and safety procedures will be in place to support student and teacher safety.

Distance Learning

  • If a system is offering distance learning, parents can choose that option. They may be asked to commit for a certain period of time, such as a grading period.
  • Attendance can be earned through the delivery of virtual instruction, and as always, students must attend 90% of the days a course is offered to be awarded credit for the course and/or to be promoted to the next grade.
  • Any parent may request that their student be offered virtual instruction from any school system that offers such instruction.

Homeschooling

This is yet another option that many families are considering. Homeschooling isn’t the same as distance learning, but it is an option that many RGV families already choose. A few online resources are below.

So, RGV Moms, what are you planning to do when it comes to school in the fall? Comment below with resources and we will update this post in the coming weeks.

The beginning of the school year is quickly approaching, and it seems to be anything other than normal. Unprecedented is what I would call it.

There are so many questions on all of our minds. How can we make sure that our children get a great education? How can we make sure that our children stay safe if and when we need to return to work?

An Unprecedented Time

Earlier this month, the Texas Education Agency issued guidelines that detail ways in which the state will be supporting families and schools when it comes to education during the pandemic. These guidelines were based on recommendations by both the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

In short, parents will have more of a say than ever when it comes to the school setting that is best for their children. Attendance (a mandatory of 90% of time that the class is offered, as usual) may be earned through in-person or virtual participation.

Wow. Just wow. If you have school-aged children, you’ve probably already received communication from your school district in the form of a survey or a draft of their plan. Scroll to the bottom of the page for a directory of school websites throughout the RGV.

An Unprecedented Amount of Choice

On-Campus Learning 

  • According to the TEA, “Daily on-campus learning will be available to all parents who would like their students to learn in school each day.”
  • Health and safety procedures will be in place to support student and teacher safety.

Distance Learning

  • If a system is offering distance learning, parents can choose that option. They may be asked to commit for a certain period of time, such as a grading period.
  • Attendance can be earned through the delivery of virtual instruction, and as always, students must attend 90% of the days a course is offered to be awarded credit for the course and/or to be promoted to the next grade.
  • Any parent may request that their student be offered virtual instruction from any school system that offers such instruction.

Homeschooling

This is yet another option that many families are considering. Homeschooling isn’t the same as distance learning, but it is an option that many RGV families already choose. A few online resources are below.

So, RGV Moms, what are you planning to do when it comes to school in the fall? Comment below with resources and we will update this post in the coming weeks.

Local RGV Digital Resource Guide

School is out! What do we do with our kiddos this summer without local camps, VBS, and the other group activities we are so used to? We want to keep them active and learning, but by this point in time, our collective creativity may be running low — or is it just me?

Don’t worry RGV Moms, the RGV has you covered! We’ve rounded up a great listing of LOCAL businesses and organizations that are offering some great digital content to keep your kiddos engaged and entertained.

Back in March, RGV Moms put together a listing of online resources from all across the web. Many of those links are still available and free!

Now, on to all that the Valley has to offer – and it’s a LOT!

Local RGV Digital Resource Guide

McAllen Public Libary


Dustin M. Sekula Memorial Library (Edinburg)


Brownsville Public Library System


City of Pharr Parks and Recreation

  • Ballet, cheer, dance and taekwondo classes available via Zoom. Call Pharr Parks and Recreation at (956) 402-4550 for more information or to sign up, or register online at www.pharrparks.com.
  • Virtual programming is also available via the City of Pharr Facebook page.

City of McAllen Parks and Recreation

  • UNPLUGGED: video guides to at-home activities via social media (@McAllenParks) or their YouTube channel every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 3:00 pm (i.e. carts and crafts, couch to 5K, folklorico dancing, guitar lessons, etc.)
  • E-SPORTS: Join the City of McAllen Parks and Recreation‘s brand new e-sports league via the Mission Control app.
  • IN-PERSON ACTIVITIES: Limited spaces available for in-person camps and activities at Community Centers, Quinta Mazatlan and more. Registration open June 1.

Boys and Girls Club of McAllen


Gladys Porter Zoo

  • Daily videos from their zookeepers highlighting different animals and what it takes to care for them, as well as virtual tours of different areas of the zoo via the Gladys Porter Zoo Facebook Page

Children’s Museum of Brownsville


Quinta Mazatlan World Birding Center


IMAS

  • Virtual arts and science programming available via the IMAS Facebook Page. Weekly content includes Toddler Tuesday and Workshop Wednesday.
  • Operation Imagination Virtual Summer Camp: FREE Content from IMAS Educators each weekday in June. A weekly kit ($40) is available for purchase, which includes supplies for 19 hands-on lessons and access to live webinars sessions with IMAS Educators each camp day.

Have a great local resource that we missed? Comment below and we’ll get it added in! And don’t forget our listing of online resources from all across the web. RGV Moms, we’ve got your back!

It’s Time for an [ All Good ] Diaper Run!

RGV Moms is pleased to partner with All Good to bring you this sponsored content. All opinions are 100% our own.

As a foster mom for nearly eight years, going on a diaper run is usually my first (and a truly essential) outing after receiving a new little one in our home.

During our time as a foster family, we’ve welcomed over a dozen children into our care, and I can think of only a few little ones who have come equipped with enough diapers to last them through the day — the day…I’m totally serious.

Hence, the diaper run.

Making the Most of My Diaper Run

I’ve recently come to love All Good Diapers, a new brand available exclusively at Wal-Mart. These diapers are full of all of the good stuff, without any of the bad. They are free of fragrance, elemental chlorine bleaching, parabens, and latex. They’re also hypoallergenic and breathable to ensure that baby’s skin is treated right from the start. AND for every box purchased, All Good donates one day’s worth of diapers to little ones in need through their partnership with Feeding America. These are diapers that make a difference. It’s a no brainer, which makes my job of choosing something good so much easier.

As a foster mom, I’m coming alongside families to support children in need, and the diapers I’m buying are doing the same thing. Incredible.

While I’m on my diaper run, Wal-Mart is a great place to stock up on baby, toddler, and household essentials. I make sure to grab some new sippy cups, a toothbrush and toothpaste, shampoo, blankets, and a stuffed animal. There are a LOT of people in our house (ALL THE TIME), so I grab some toilet paper and laundry detergent while I’m out.

Or, in this new coronavirus normal in which we find ourselves, I do a virtual diaper run via Wal-Mart grocery pick-up!

All Good Diapers for babyWe’re All Good

I take a lot of care when it comes to a new child in my home. I want to make sure that he or she feels as comfortable and secure as possible. A few brand new items (even if they are essentials) usually help, as well as a cuddly companion.

Match all of that with the softness and strength of All Good Diapers, and the stage is set for a smooth transition to life in our home. I’m definitely not a perfect parent, but I do all I can to make the children in my care feel comfortable, safe, and secure.

All Good Diaper ChangeWhether you’re welcoming a new little one, or doing all you can for the ones who have been with you from the start, you can help families in need by purchasing All Good Diapers. Visit Wal-Mart.com/AllGood for more information, or follow All Good on Instagram and Facebook [@AllGoodDiapers] to learn more!

All Good Diapers for baby

At Home, but Not Really: Attention and Focus in a Digital World

Are you having trouble paying attention to simple tasks like I am? For a long time now I have subscribed to digital minimalist philosophy and have even taught it in my classes, but I think it’s especially important right now.

We should use digital media intentionally, essentially Kondo-ing everything not strictly necessary for an allotted time, and then reintroducing only that which furthers our personal or professional goals.

Using technology mindfully rather than mindlessly

More than ever, we need to be careful where we invest our attention. It is easily absorbed in the news and online resources that are forwarded to us. My university students recently expressed that though their bodies were at home, distance learning kept them from spending meaningful time with their families.

They were at home, but not really.

Research shows that when we quickly move from one task to another and back, we are hurting our brains. Kids naturally have a short attention span and move quickly from one thing to another.

Paying Attention to our own Attention Span

As parents, we can help our kids grow their attention span by being careful about our own.

I am constantly tempted to jump from one screen to another in the name of efficiency, yet if I am to take the research seriously, I need to stop and just focus on one task at a time, and when it’s done, move on to the next task.

I think we need to be especially vigilant of our attention now during the Coronavirus pandemic, when a lot of what we are doing is online, and the internet begs us to switch tasks from second to second. It feels exciting and even productive to switch tasks and windows. But it’s also hurting our attention in the long run.

If you are having trouble concentrating on any one thing, try slowing down. If we would benefit from anything right now, it’s meditation.

I’m convinced that slowing down as much as is possible is the key to being healthy during this time.

I myself have become more hermit-like: I still talk to long-distance friends on the phone, which I always have. But I don’t want to communicate with anyone by phone, email, and text, much less by Zoom. We need to be aware of how our activities affect our attention. Everyone will mean something different by “slowing down,” but I think the concept is a good start.

Be All There

While we’re home, let’s try to be home. What a shame it would be to be home but not really.

May Book Recommendation:

Casey Schwartz, Attention: A Love Story (2020)

Cal Newport, Digital Minimalism (2019)

Jenny Odell, How to do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy (2019)

A Silver Lining While Stuck at Home

The news out there is heavy. Can you feel it? Like thunderclouds that are about to explode. But, if you squint and look just right, can you see it? There’s a silver lining.

Some days the silver lining is easy to spot and I’m easy to smile. And some days, it’s faint and hard to detect — a little bit like my patience. But, in the midst of this unprecedented time in our history, I’m choosing to squint. I’m choosing to believe that there is a bright, strong sun behind that big, dark cloud. I’m choosing to spot the silver lining and to hold on with all my might.

There are six people in my house. Six people. All. The. Time.

It’s intense. And messy. And loud.

But all in all, we’ve also been able to engage in some really fun and exciting adventures that I can guarantee we wouldn’t have found room for in our usual schedule.

Saying Yes! to Creativity and Adventure

Some of the activities have been virtual — what I like to call the Internet at its finest — and many of them have been proximal — with those right beside us.

PE with Joe YouTubeWe’ve gone to England and participated in PE with Joe. He’s great with the kids, and I’ve even been participating in the workouts as well. Every day we spot the differences and get our hearts pumping.

Silver Lining Stuck at Home 1

We took hours to make a huge box into an awesome fort, complete with indoor and outdoor decorations.

Google Earth National ParksWe’ve taken virtual tours of the National Parks, and even found our own house on Google Earth (ok, that was a little bit creepy!)

Silver Lining Stuck at Home 1

We’ve made DIY liquid watercolors and Kool-Aid ice cubes, and experimented in a gigantic sensory bin.

Lunch Doodles with Mo WillemsWe’ve Lunch Doodle-ed with Mo Willems and entered into the home studio of one of our favorite authors and gotten a behind-the-scenes tour on writing and illustrating books for children. And my kids can’t stop drawing the pigeon. The pigeon is everywhere! This one, seriously, has been a favorite. Check it out, if you haven’t already!

I never would have said yes to many of these activities (or the length of these activities, or the mess of these activities) had we not been stuck at home. But here we are with nothing but time, so what was my answer? Yes!

I hope, when we all come out of this, that my kids remember the fun we had and the time we spent together. I hope that we can adjust our schedule to allow for more freedom and creativity. I hope that I can keep saying “Yes!” to my kids and their crazy plans!

Need some more ideas? Check out our Resource Guide or comment below!

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In + Around RGV

Let’s Explore: Quinta Mazatlan

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Hey RGV Moms, we're adding more adventures to our "Let's Explore" series and highlighting some great spots in the RGV to visit with your...