Unprecedented: Weighing Options for School in the Fall

The beginning of the school year is quickly approaching, and it seems to be anything other than normal. Unprecedented is what I would call it.

There are so many questions on all of our minds.

How can we make sure that our children get a great education? How can we make sure that our children stay safe if and when we need to return to work?

An Unprecedented Time

Earlier this month, the Texas Education Agency issued guidelines that detail ways in which the state will be supporting families and schools when it comes to education during the pandemic. These guidelines were based on recommendations by both the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

In short, parents will have more of a say than ever when it comes to the school setting that is best for their children. Attendance (a mandatory of 90% of time that the class is offered, as usual) may be earned through in-person or virtual participation.

Wow. Just wow. If you have school-aged children, you’ve probably already received communication from your school district in the form of a survey or a draft of their plan. Scroll to the bottom of the page for a directory of school websites throughout the RGV.

An Unprecedented Amount of Choice

On-Campus Learning 

  • According to the TEA, “Daily on-campus learning will be available to all parents who would like their students to learn in school each day.”
  • Health and safety procedures will be in place to support student and teacher safety.

Distance Learning

  • If a system is offering distance learning, parents can choose that option. They may be asked to commit for a certain period of time, such as a grading period.
  • Attendance can be earned through the delivery of virtual instruction, and as always, students must attend 90% of the days a course is offered to be awarded credit for the course and/or to be promoted to the next grade.
  • Any parent may request that their student be offered virtual instruction from any school system that offers such instruction.

Homeschooling

This is yet another option that many families are considering. Homeschooling isn’t the same as distance learning, but it is an option that many RGV families already choose. A few online resources are below.

So, RGV Moms, what are you planning to do when it comes to school in the fall? Comment below with resources and we will update this post in the coming weeks.

The beginning of the school year is quickly approaching, and it seems to be anything other than normal. Unprecedented is what I would call it.

There are so many questions on all of our minds. How can we make sure that our children get a great education? How can we make sure that our children stay safe if and when we need to return to work?

An Unprecedented Time

Earlier this month, the Texas Education Agency issued guidelines that detail ways in which the state will be supporting families and schools when it comes to education during the pandemic. These guidelines were based on recommendations by both the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

In short, parents will have more of a say than ever when it comes to the school setting that is best for their children. Attendance (a mandatory of 90% of time that the class is offered, as usual) may be earned through in-person or virtual participation.

Wow. Just wow. If you have school-aged children, you’ve probably already received communication from your school district in the form of a survey or a draft of their plan. Scroll to the bottom of the page for a directory of school websites throughout the RGV.

An Unprecedented Amount of Choice

On-Campus Learning 

  • According to the TEA, “Daily on-campus learning will be available to all parents who would like their students to learn in school each day.”
  • Health and safety procedures will be in place to support student and teacher safety.

Distance Learning

  • If a system is offering distance learning, parents can choose that option. They may be asked to commit for a certain period of time, such as a grading period.
  • Attendance can be earned through the delivery of virtual instruction, and as always, students must attend 90% of the days a course is offered to be awarded credit for the course and/or to be promoted to the next grade.
  • Any parent may request that their student be offered virtual instruction from any school system that offers such instruction.

Homeschooling

This is yet another option that many families are considering. Homeschooling isn’t the same as distance learning, but it is an option that many RGV families already choose. A few online resources are below.

So, RGV Moms, what are you planning to do when it comes to school in the fall? Comment below with resources and we will update this post in the coming weeks.

Local RGV Digital Resource Guide

School is out! What do we do with our kiddos this summer without local camps, VBS, and the other group activities we are so used to? We want to keep them active and learning, but by this point in time, our collective creativity may be running low — or is it just me?

Don’t worry RGV Moms, the RGV has you covered! We’ve rounded up a great listing of LOCAL businesses and organizations that are offering some great digital content to keep your kiddos engaged and entertained.

Back in March, RGV Moms put together a listing of online resources from all across the web. Many of those links are still available and free!

Now, on to all that the Valley has to offer – and it’s a LOT!

Local RGV Digital Resource Guide

McAllen Public Libary


Dustin M. Sekula Memorial Library (Edinburg)


Brownsville Public Library System


City of Pharr Parks and Recreation

  • Ballet, cheer, dance and taekwondo classes available via Zoom. Call Pharr Parks and Recreation at (956) 402-4550 for more information or to sign up, or register online at www.pharrparks.com.
  • Virtual programming is also available via the City of Pharr Facebook page.

City of McAllen Parks and Recreation

  • UNPLUGGED: video guides to at-home activities via social media (@McAllenParks) or their YouTube channel every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 3:00 pm (i.e. carts and crafts, couch to 5K, folklorico dancing, guitar lessons, etc.)
  • E-SPORTS: Join the City of McAllen Parks and Recreation‘s brand new e-sports league via the Mission Control app.
  • IN-PERSON ACTIVITIES: Limited spaces available for in-person camps and activities at Community Centers, Quinta Mazatlan and more. Registration open June 1.

Boys and Girls Club of McAllen


Gladys Porter Zoo

  • Daily videos from their zookeepers highlighting different animals and what it takes to care for them, as well as virtual tours of different areas of the zoo via the Gladys Porter Zoo Facebook Page

Children’s Museum of Brownsville


Quinta Mazatlan World Birding Center


IMAS

  • Virtual arts and science programming available via the IMAS Facebook Page. Weekly content includes Toddler Tuesday and Workshop Wednesday.
  • Operation Imagination Virtual Summer Camp: FREE Content from IMAS Educators each weekday in June. A weekly kit ($40) is available for purchase, which includes supplies for 19 hands-on lessons and access to live webinars sessions with IMAS Educators each camp day.

Have a great local resource that we missed? Comment below and we’ll get it added in! And don’t forget our listing of online resources from all across the web. RGV Moms, we’ve got your back!

It’s Time for an [ All Good ] Diaper Run!

RGV Moms is pleased to partner with All Good to bring you this sponsored content. All opinions are 100% our own.

As a foster mom for nearly eight years, going on a diaper run is usually my first (and a truly essential) outing after receiving a new little one in our home.

During our time as a foster family, we’ve welcomed over a dozen children into our care, and I can think of only a few little ones who have come equipped with enough diapers to last them through the day — the day…I’m totally serious.

Hence, the diaper run.

Making the Most of My Diaper Run

I’ve recently come to love All Good Diapers, a new brand available exclusively at Wal-Mart. These diapers are full of all of the good stuff, without any of the bad. They are free of fragrance, elemental chlorine bleaching, parabens, and latex. They’re also hypoallergenic and breathable to ensure that baby’s skin is treated right from the start. AND for every box purchased, All Good donates one day’s worth of diapers to little ones in need through their partnership with Feeding America. These are diapers that make a difference. It’s a no brainer, which makes my job of choosing something good so much easier.

As a foster mom, I’m coming alongside families to support children in need, and the diapers I’m buying are doing the same thing. Incredible.

While I’m on my diaper run, Wal-Mart is a great place to stock up on baby, toddler, and household essentials. I make sure to grab some new sippy cups, a toothbrush and toothpaste, shampoo, blankets, and a stuffed animal. There are a LOT of people in our house (ALL THE TIME), so I grab some toilet paper and laundry detergent while I’m out.

Or, in this new coronavirus normal in which we find ourselves, I do a virtual diaper run via Wal-Mart grocery pick-up!

All Good Diapers for babyWe’re All Good

I take a lot of care when it comes to a new child in my home. I want to make sure that he or she feels as comfortable and secure as possible. A few brand new items (even if they are essentials) usually help, as well as a cuddly companion.

Match all of that with the softness and strength of All Good Diapers, and the stage is set for a smooth transition to life in our home. I’m definitely not a perfect parent, but I do all I can to make the children in my care feel comfortable, safe, and secure.

All Good Diaper ChangeWhether you’re welcoming a new little one, or doing all you can for the ones who have been with you from the start, you can help families in need by purchasing All Good Diapers. Visit Wal-Mart.com/AllGood for more information, or follow All Good on Instagram and Facebook [@AllGoodDiapers] to learn more!

All Good Diapers for baby

At Home, but Not Really: Attention and Focus in a Digital World

Are you having trouble paying attention to simple tasks like I am? For a long time now I have subscribed to digital minimalist philosophy and have even taught it in my classes, but I think it’s especially important right now.

We should use digital media intentionally, essentially Kondo-ing everything not strictly necessary for an allotted time, and then reintroducing only that which furthers our personal or professional goals.

Using technology mindfully rather than mindlessly

More than ever, we need to be careful where we invest our attention. It is easily absorbed in the news and online resources that are forwarded to us. My university students recently expressed that though their bodies were at home, distance learning kept them from spending meaningful time with their families.

They were at home, but not really.

Research shows that when we quickly move from one task to another and back, we are hurting our brains. Kids naturally have a short attention span and move quickly from one thing to another.

Paying Attention to our own Attention Span

As parents, we can help our kids grow their attention span by being careful about our own.

I am constantly tempted to jump from one screen to another in the name of efficiency, yet if I am to take the research seriously, I need to stop and just focus on one task at a time, and when it’s done, move on to the next task.

I think we need to be especially vigilant of our attention now during the Coronavirus pandemic, when a lot of what we are doing is online, and the internet begs us to switch tasks from second to second. It feels exciting and even productive to switch tasks and windows. But it’s also hurting our attention in the long run.

If you are having trouble concentrating on any one thing, try slowing down. If we would benefit from anything right now, it’s meditation.

I’m convinced that slowing down as much as is possible is the key to being healthy during this time.

I myself have become more hermit-like: I still talk to long-distance friends on the phone, which I always have. But I don’t want to communicate with anyone by phone, email, and text, much less by Zoom. We need to be aware of how our activities affect our attention. Everyone will mean something different by “slowing down,” but I think the concept is a good start.

Be All There

While we’re home, let’s try to be home. What a shame it would be to be home but not really.

May Book Recommendation:

Casey Schwartz, Attention: A Love Story (2020)

Cal Newport, Digital Minimalism (2019)

Jenny Odell, How to do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy (2019)

A Silver Lining While Stuck at Home

The news out there is heavy. Can you feel it? Like thunderclouds that are about to explode. But, if you squint and look just right, can you see it? There’s a silver lining.

Some days the silver lining is easy to spot and I’m easy to smile. And some days, it’s faint and hard to detect — a little bit like my patience. But, in the midst of this unprecedented time in our history, I’m choosing to squint. I’m choosing to believe that there is a bright, strong sun behind that big, dark cloud. I’m choosing to spot the silver lining and to hold on with all my might.

There are six people in my house. Six people. All. The. Time.

It’s intense. And messy. And loud.

But all in all, we’ve also been able to engage in some really fun and exciting adventures that I can guarantee we wouldn’t have found room for in our usual schedule.

Saying Yes! to Creativity and Adventure

Some of the activities have been virtual — what I like to call the Internet at its finest — and many of them have been proximal — with those right beside us.

PE with Joe YouTubeWe’ve gone to England and participated in PE with Joe. He’s great with the kids, and I’ve even been participating in the workouts as well. Every day we spot the differences and get our hearts pumping.

Silver Lining Stuck at Home 1

We took hours to make a huge box into an awesome fort, complete with indoor and outdoor decorations.

Google Earth National ParksWe’ve taken virtual tours of the National Parks, and even found our own house on Google Earth (ok, that was a little bit creepy!)

Silver Lining Stuck at Home 1

We’ve made DIY liquid watercolors and Kool-Aid ice cubes, and experimented in a gigantic sensory bin.

Lunch Doodles with Mo WillemsWe’ve Lunch Doodle-ed with Mo Willems and entered into the home studio of one of our favorite authors and gotten a behind-the-scenes tour on writing and illustrating books for children. And my kids can’t stop drawing the pigeon. The pigeon is everywhere! This one, seriously, has been a favorite. Check it out, if you haven’t already!

I never would have said yes to many of these activities (or the length of these activities, or the mess of these activities) had we not been stuck at home. But here we are with nothing but time, so what was my answer? Yes!

I hope, when we all come out of this, that my kids remember the fun we had and the time we spent together. I hope that we can adjust our schedule to allow for more freedom and creativity. I hope that I can keep saying “Yes!” to my kids and their crazy plans!

Need some more ideas? Check out our Resource Guide or comment below!

Proximity Learning in the Age of Quarantine

We’ve all become accustomed to distance learning in the last few weeks. But I have a proposal. What if we try a little (or a lot) of proximity learning?

We may all be RGV moms, but we have kids of different ages going to different schools, preschools, and daycares. Some of us are essential workers and others of us are no longer employed. Some of us are furloughed and some are working from home. Some are single parents and some live with extended family.

I present these proximity learning ideas with these differences in mind; not each one will be feasible for you, but it might help get your imagination going about what’s possible.

If you are at home with your children, here are some tips for proximity learning — teach them what you know while you’re close by. Please feel free to leave more ideas in the comments!

Practice proximity learning instead of (or in addition to) distance learning:

  • Only use screens for learning when you absolutely have to. Remember that the conclusions of the scientific research detailing the harm of too much screen-time don’t disappear just because we are in a pandemic. Use screens for entertainment and connection with family members and leave learning to the physical world (and the world of the mind). Remember that you can question the authority/tools of your child’s school. Administrators are not going to take responsibility for your 20-year old who doesn’t know how to focus because they spent eight hours a day on the iPad doing “homework” when they were 10.
  • Let your kids cook with you or for you. Some kids like to pretend they own a restaurant. Let them make the menu of foods they can make, and then you can be the customer.
  • Show your kids how to sew or crochet or knit or needle-point. This may be the best time for this type of thing since we have no extra-curricular activities to take them to. Whatever you love to do, do it with your kids around. Music? Scrapbooking? Cleaning? Just don’t force them into it; make them come to you. Joy is contagious.
  • Let your kids be bored!
  • Show the kids home-movies and photos from when you were young. Use this time to bond as a family.
  • Institute a special night: game night, family movie night, etc. Don’t do this every night. Make them wait for it and it will be special. Focus on creating memories for them. The key is to put the phones away. Most people mistake taking photos for making memories. To make a memory last, do not take a photo of it. Think ahead of how they will describe this pandemic time. What will stick out most to them?
  • Don’t think of education as “out there” but “in here”: what can I show them about what I know, what I can do, what I enjoy, etc.? Education is infinitely greater than algebra, science, and social studies. Education traditionally means passing along your wisdom and know-how to the next generation, which takes living and doing, and not just thinking.
  • Think differently about formal education. Ask yourself: what does the teacher/school want my child to learn? What are the benchmarks? If it’s learning the multiplication table, then you can have a say in how they do it. Think: what are the goals? instead of what did the teacher assign? Math can be learned through cooking, and science can be learned from taking a walk. My advice is to stay as tethered to the physical world as you can.
  • Read physical books together. The McAllen public library is open for people to pick up books. Order them online and they bring them to your trunk at the main branch location.

One thing I have found helpful is to give children choices at the beginning of the week and let them decide what to do. This includes chores, games, projects, sports, etc. They do much better when we create the conditions and give them a few choices but then they get to have the final say. This doesn’t necessarily apply from moment to moment or you may be setting yourself up for constant change.

Instead, have a weekly discussion about what they want to work on this week. For example, I want you to take on a new chore this week, and I have printed out a list of options. Choose whichever one you would like to learn/do. Note: all of the options should be equal to you, and you should show no preference. As soon as my kids sniff out what I want them to do, it goes to the bottom of their list. We are inherently rebellious, aren’t we?

Recommended reading: Duct Tape Parenting (2013) by Vicki Hoefle. This is one of the best parenting books I have ever read, and it has worked wonders in my house.

On Wednesdays We Wear Pants

Life as a full-time work-from-homeschooling-mom with an essential worker husband has been, well, it’s been interesting. Our life feels so unstructured, so chaotic, sometimes fun, sometimes stressful. That yearning for structure is why, on Wednesdays, we wear pants.

Shortly after my third baby was born, I began my life as a work-from-home mom. Juggling an infant, and a toddler and a preschooler while working was a difficult task, but I was 100% up for the challenge. Now, a year later in our new shelter-in-place normal, I’m also having to homeschooling my kindergartener on top of everything else, and I feel like I’m right back to square one.

Not on Wednesdays, though. On Wednesdays, we wear pants.

One day a week, we can get dressed, with nowhere to go but our living room, and our backyard. Sometimes the kitchen (okay, okay, a lot of times the kitchen). Why Wednesday? Probably because Wednesdays are my work meetings. Probably because it’s my rest day after a long Tuesday. Mostly, because it works.

I won’t lie. Getting ready for the day is not an easy task for someone who struggles with anxiety. Sometimes I feel like I can’t breathe. I take my temperature, and check my oxygen, and then I know it’s just anxiety.

Having a set daily schedule, with set daily tasks seems nearly impossible, uncontrollable – but I can actively choose one day a week to wear pants.

So, that is exactly what I do. What are you doing for self-care these days? Comment below!

Coronavirus Outbreak: Accessing Online Educational Resources

If you’re anything like me, this coronavirus outbreak caught you a little off-guard. More like, having the kids home from school for an extra week after Spring Break with the possibility of long-term distance learning caught you a little off-guard!

RGV Moms has put together a list of online educational resources that are offering free access or free trial access to parents and families affected by the coronavirus outbreak. If you have found a great one that we’ve missed, please comment at the end of the post, and we’ll be happy to add it in.

Educational Resources with Free Trials

  • Create Learn: Free trial of interactive classes in coding
  • Fluency & Fitness: 21 days of unlimited access to K-2 content around reading, math, and movement
  • Othergoose: Homeschool resources available free for 21 days
  • Learning A-Z/Raz Kids: 14-day free trial to leveled books and quizzes
  • Scholastic: 20 days of thematic content separated by grade level.
  • Virtual Museums: These 12 Famous Museums Offer Virtual Tours You Can Take on Your Couch (Video)

Free Educational Resources

  • 123Homeschool4Me: 200,000 pages of free printable worksheets, organized by grade level and content area
  • All Kids Network: Printables, activities, crafts and more
  • Bill Nye the Science Guy: Access to videos broken down into life science, physical science and planetary science lessons
  • Classroom Cereal: Grammar practice in free, printable short stories
  • CIRCLE Family Activity Collection: Hands-on activities for families organized by areas of child development research, such as: Language & CommunicationReading & WritingMathScience, Social & EmotionalPhysical Development, and Art & Sensory
  • Club Oasis: Online STEM club allows you to connect with other parents, teachers, and STEAM kids interested in STEM activities, lessons, and collaboration
  • Discovery K12: Homeschool platform and curriculum for grades K-12
  • Duolingo: Language learning platform
  • Dreamscape: Literacy games combining strategy, engagement, and imaginative reading passages for grades 2-8
  • Edhelper.com: Learning workbooks organized by grade level
  • GoNoodle: Free access to movement and mindfulness videos created by child development experts
  • Have Fun Teaching: Free relief packs by grade level
  • Highlights Kids: Access to games, quizzes and more
  • HippoCampus: Explore over 7,000 free videos in 13 subject areas (grades 6+)
  • iCivics: Educational online games to promote civics education and encourage students to become active citizens
  • iReady Practice Packs: Printable At-Home Activity Packs for grades K-8
  • Izzit: Free videos and resources on a range of educational topics
  • Khan Academy Kids: Free app with educational games & books
  • Little Twisters Yoga: Free at-home kids yoga
  • Lunch Doodles with Mo Willems: doodle along-side author and illustrator Mo Willems
  • National Geographic Kids: Videos, games and lots more to learn
  • Nomster Chef Recipes: Access to free recipes for families to work together in the kitchen
  • PBS LearningMedia: PBS-created content, shows, games and more
  • Prodigy Game: Engaging math games for grades 1-8.
  • Real Time Curriculum Project: Curated access to current events
  • Sciencewerkz: 5 free downloads of interactive middle school science content
  • Storyline Online: streams videos featuring celebrated actors reading children’s books alongside creatively produced illustrations
  • Storytime from Space: hear astronauts read-aloud space-themed books while they’re actually in space!
  • Typing Club: Touch typing tutorials

Live Webcams & Virtual Tours

Educational Television Shows

For a complete listing, please visit amazingeducationalresources.com. We are not partnering with any of these companies, but are glad to make this resource list available. Please make sure to read the fine print for details and cancellation deadlines.

Coronavirus Wisdom from our Sister Sites

As a City Mom Collective Sister Site, we’ve also compiled a list of helpful resources from our sister sites nationwide.

Let’s Explore: McAllen Nature Center

Hey RGV Moms, we’re continuing our “Let’s Explore” series and highlighting some great RGV spots to visit with your kiddos. Today’s stop: McAllen Nature Center.

McAllen Nature Center

RGVMB Directory Listing

Location: 4101 West Business 83, McAllen

Phone: (956) 681-3333

Hours: June – October: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. to Sunset; November – May: 8 a.m. to Sunset

Cost: Free admission with a suggested donation of $1/person

Time Needed: 1-2 hours

Website: www.mcallen.net/departments/parks/mcallen-nature-center

Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/McAllenNatureCenter/

Let’s Explore!

I took my two littles to McAllen Nature Center and we had a great time exploring! This is a great spot to change up your daily routine and get your kiddos out into nature. After you park, you’ll walk down the hill and sign in at the visitor center. Park admission free with a suggested donation $1/person.

Right at the visitor center, there was a neat building set that my 4-year-old just loved. Next, we checked out the cactus garden, and I suggest you keep a close eye on the littles for this one!

I had visited the Nature Center a few years ago, and they’ve since added a cool feature – Lantana Hill. You can climb up the steep hill and see the trails and nature below. We also enjoyed a picnic lunch under the large oak trees.

Close by to the picnic tables, you’ll find restrooms and the trail heads for the different trails in the park. We were there with a stroller, so navigating the caliche paths was a bit of a struggle. If you had a jogging stroller, you’d have no problem at all. There are three main trails with some extra loops off of each of them.

McAllen Nature Center has a lot going on, from volunteer opportunities to yoga to nature walks and geocaching. You can check out their Facebook page for more info.

Insider Tips:

  • Bring water, sunscreen, and bug spray
  • Plan your visit around lunch. They have a great, shaded picnic area
  • Wear good tennis shoes, as the incline up Lantana Hill is pretty steep. And make sure your kiddos don’t run up there without you. It’s would be a big drop if they were to fall.
  • I recommend this adventure for kids ages three and up. The paths are (jogging) stroller-friendly, but there is quite a bit of cactus within the grasp of those unsteady walkers.
  • Groups of 10 or more can schedule a custom tour, so get your mama friends together and set a date!

RGV Moms, get out there and explore all that the Valley has to offer! Check out the “Outdoor Play” section of our Directory for more information and ideas!

El programa de Lenguaje Dual en el Valle

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Este es el momento en el que tienes que pensar a que escuela mandaras a tus pequeños. Aquí tenemos información importante sobre las escuelas Del Valle que ofrecen el programa de Lenguaje Dual. Lee esto y esto, si sigues sin estar convencida de que tus hijos deberían estar aprendiendo Español, además del Inglés, ahora ¿Mejor aprender de niño que de adulto, verdad? Después de todo, el ser bilingüe vale por dos!

Cuando es hora de escoger una escuela para tus hijos, es buena idea visitar la escuela e intentar ver un salón si es posible. Muchos de los distritos del área son de inscripción abierta. Eso significa que si vives en Edinburg, que no tiene el programa de Lenguaje Dual, puedes transferirte a McAllen o PSJA por ejemplo. Aquí está una lista en orden alfabético de los distritos y escuelas que tienen instrucción de Lenguaje Dual (100 en total). Nota que PSJA tienen Lenguaje Dual hasta la preparatoria, McAllen, Harlingen, y La Joya lo tienen en la secundaria.

Lee esta información en inglés

Donna ISD

  1. Singleterry Elementary
  2. Captain D. Salinas Elementary
  3. S. Garza Elementary
  4. Salazar Elementary
  5. Runn Elementary
  6. M Rivas Elementary
  7. M. Ochoa Elementary

Excellence in Leadership

  1. Excellence In Leadership Academy

Harlingen CISD

  1. Wilson Elementary School
  2. Lamar Elementary Dual Language Academy
  3. Ben Milam Elementary School
  4. Lee Means Elementary Fine Arts Academy
  5. Sam Houston Elementary Dual Language Academy
  6. Vernon Middle School

Hidalgo ISD

  1. Hidalgo Early Start Academy
  2. JC Kelly Elementary
  3. Alejo-Salinas Elementary
  4. Hidalgo Park Elementary
  5. Hidalgo Elementary

Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD

  1. Allen & William Arnold Elementary
  2. Raul Longoria Elementary
  3. William Long Elementary
  4. Daniel Ramirez Elementary
  5. Arnoldo Cantu Sr. Elementary
  6. Aida C. Escobar Elementary
  7. Reed & Mock Elementary
  8. Henry Ford Elementary
  9. John Doedyns Elementary
  10. Kelly-Pharr Elementary
  11. Geraldine Palmer Elementary
  12. Vida N. Clover Elementary
  13. Edith & Ethel Carman Elementary
  14. Alfred Sorensen Elementary
  15. Santos Livas Elementary
  16. Austin Middle School
  17. Kennedy Middle School
  18. Yzaguirre Middle School
  19. Liberty Middle School
  20. LBJ Middle School
  21. Audie Murphy Middle School
  22. PSJA Collegiate High School Program
  23. PSJA Early College High School
  24. PSJA Thomas Jefferson T-STEM Early College High School
  25. PSJA North Early College High School

La Joya ISD

  1. Enrique Camarena Elementary
  2. Emiliano Zapata Elementary
  3. Diaz/Villarreal Elementary
  4. Kika De La Garza Elementary
  5. Americo Paredes Elementary
  6. Patricio Perez Elementary
  7. Narciso G. Cavazos Elementary
  8. Elodia R. Chapa Elementary
  9. Evangelina Garza Elementary
  10. Henry B. Gonzalez Elementary
  11. Palmira Mendiola Elementary
  12. Jose De Escandon Elementary
  13. Juan N. Seguin Elementary
  14. Guillermo Flores Elementary
  15. John F. Kennedy Elementary
  16. William J. Clinton Elementary
  17. Domingo Trevino Middle School
  18. Memorial Middle School

McAllen ISD

  1. Blanca E. Sanchez Elementary (my kids go here)
  2. Pablo Perez Elementary
  3. Leonelo H. Gonzalez Elementary
  4. Ben Milam Elementary
  5. Christa McAuliffe Elementary
  6. Andrew Jackson Elementary
  7. Victor Fields Elementary
  8. Michael E. Fossum Middle School

Mission CISD

  1. Alton Elementary
  2. Salinas Elementary
  3. Midkiff Elementary
  4. Cantu Elementary
  5. Waitz Elementary
  6. Cavazos Elementary
  7. Mims Elementary
  8. Escobar/Rios Elementary
  9. Bryan Elementary
  10. Marcell Elementary
  11. Castro Elementary
  12. Pearson Elementary
  13. Leal Elementary

Rio Grande City CISD

  1. Alto Bonito Elementary
  2. Grulla Elementary
  3. John and Olive Hinojosa Elementary
  4. Ringgold Elementary
  5. Academy for Academic Enhancement
  6. Alberto & Celia Barrera Elementary
  7. General Ricardo Sanchez Elementary
  8. Roque Guerra Jr. Elementary

Vanguard Academy

  1. Beethoven Elementary
  2. Rembrant Elementary
  3. Mozart Elementary
  4. Picasso Elementary

Esta información ha sido aportada por RGV PUEDE (Padres Unidos Para Educación Dual Excelente, fundada por mi esposo y yo.) Para más información, ve a http://www.rgvpuede.org/es/. Si deseas unirte a PUEDE, también puedes hacerlo por medio de la página web. Si tú eres parte de un distrito que no tiene el programa de lenguaje dual, y te gustaría luchar para hacer un cambio, por favor manda un email a [email protected].

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